In the 1940s Messrs Raphael Tuck & Sons, "Fine Art Publishers to Their Majesties The King and Queen and to Her Majesty Queen Mary", brought out a series of booklets linked to the war effort. The cover of one of these, circa 1944, is shown left, and the illustration above, by the same artist, Frank H.Mason, appears to have been designed for a later or earlier issue by the same publishers.

Only the technology has changed. The call is the same as when Monamy first sounded it. As any hyper-aesthete will assure us, this sort of painting is contemptible. The rare palate of a connoisseur cannot busy itself with the bourgeois taste for freedom and survival.

This painting represents the menace of the return of Jacobite and Stuart rule from the continent, and the defiance of this ever-present threat by the Dover patrol of England's frail but noble wooden walls. Substitute the devilish fork of this pair of tongs with a swastika, and Byng's gallant men of war with a few Hurricanes and Spitfires, and we could be looking at a war poster from 1940.

A Spanish poster from 1937 bears the legend: The claw of the Italian invader aims to enslave us. It is reproduced in The Power of the Poster, edited by Margaret Timmers, and the caption reads "This poster was published to rally opposition to 50,000 troops who had arrived from Italy in March 1937 to support Franco's aim of capturing Madrid." The collage below incorporates the poster's central image. Monamy was a modern painter.

Just to ram the message home, here are some C20th words added to the C18th concept.


Recognisably an earlier, pre-fortification, view of the same port.


But did these prongs ever actually exist?
I guess they did.


28½ x 36¼. Attributed to Sailmaker. Uppsala Auktionskammare, Lot 1140, June 12, 2012.

1708 Dunkirk 1
battles pre 1704       battles 1704-1739
battles post 1739


Anything familiar about this stylized sea from the 1940s?
Compare the waves supporting Captain Martin's Mortar Bomb

The Analysis of Beauty

William Hogarth

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