index

 

 

Stanley B. Greenfield

Various essays

found in Hero and Exile: The Art of Old English Poetry, by Stanley B. Greenfield.
Edited by George H.Brown, 1989
and elsewhere

 

 

At times the song of the wild swan I took for my pleasure, the cry of the gannet and the sound of the curlew instead of the laughter of men, the seagull crying instead of [the conviviality accompanying] mead-drinking.

The Interpretation of Old English Poems, 1972

And yet there is no man in the world so high-hearted, nor so liberal in his gifts, nor so brave in his youth, nor so daring in his deeds, nor having so gracious a lord, that he will never have a care about his sea-voyage, as to what the Lord will do with with him [i.e., as to what the outcome of his voyage will be]. He will not have a mind for the harp, nor for receiving of rings, nor for the pleasure of woman, nor delight in the world, nor for anything else except the tossing of waves; but he who hastens on the sea will ever have grief of heart. The woods blossom, the cities grow fair, the plains become beautiful, the world hastens on; all these [it is true] urge the man eager of heart on his journey, urge onward him who so thinks to depart far on the floodways. [But] also the cuckoo urges with sad voice, the herald of summer sings, forebodes sorrow bitter in the heart. That the man who is prosperous does not know, what some suffer [i.e., some who are, like myself, unprosperous], those who set [their] exile steps the furthest.

Attitudes and Values in The Seafarer, in Hero and Exile.

[There is no man] whose lord is so dear to him that he will never have a care as to what the Lord will assign him [i.e., his fate] on his sea journey.

The Interpretation of Old English Poems, 1972.

for there's no man on earth so sea-
soned in spirit, so sure of fortune,
so graced by youth and a gracious lord,
that in his sea-faring he has no care
of what the Lord has in store for him.

Ăsthetics and Meaning and the Translation of Old English Poetry in Old English Poetry, 1979, p 96.

Wherefore now my spirit moves beyond the confines of my breast, my mind with the sea-flood, over the whale's home, turns widely across the surface of the earth; the lone-flier returns to me eager and greedy, calls loudly, urges my heart irresistibly onto the whale-path over the expanse of the seas.

Esthetics and Meaning and the Translation of Old English Poetry, and also in The Interpretation of Old English Poems, 1972, p 21

Because the joys of the Lord are dearer to me than this dead life transitory on earth ..... or ..... because dearer to me are the joys of the Lord than this dead life, transitory on earth

The Interpretation of Old English Poems, 1972

The days have departed, all the pomp of earth's kingdom. .....This host has all fallen, joys have departed, the weaker live on and possess this world, possess it with toil. Glory is laid low.

The Interpretation of Old English Poems, 1972

where we may possess our home ..... in the eternal bliss where there is the source of life in the love of the Lord

The Interpretation of Old English Poems, 1972

 

back to other versions

comment on greenfield

top